Cybersecurity is not an IT problem, but a business problem for which there may be an IT solution.
Cyberattacks will never stop, but with the right approach to cybersecurity resilience, defending against them may not be as hard as it seems. Download our guide to discover the most important areas for a business to focus on when it comes to cybersecurity resilience.

You’ll learn about:

Governing your environment icon

Governing your environment

Managing your vulnerabilities icon

Managing your vulnerabilities

Restricting administrative privileges icon

Restricting administrative privileges

Protecting email and web browsing icon

Protecting email and web browsing

Defending against malware icon

Defending against malware

And more icon

And much more

What is Cybersecurity Resilience?

Cyber resilience is a measure of how well a business can handle a cyberattack or data breach while managing to effectively operate its business.

Why is Cybersecurity Resilience Important?

Business owners and managers—with input and guidance from their IT resources—need to define, agree on, and endorse a strategy for cybersecurity from the top down, and this strategy needs to be rooted in a cybersecurity framework such as the NIST Cybersecurity Framework or the CIS Critical Controls. This guide is organized to align with the latter, but both NIST and CIS provide a wealth of practical and actionable guidance for organizations to formulate effective cybersecurity strategy in a threat-focused, vendor-neutral way.

Download the Guide

What is Cybersecurity Resiliency?

Cyber resilience is a measure of how well a business can handle a cyberattack or data breach while managing to effectively operate its business.

Why is Cybersecurity Resilience Important?

Business owners and managers—with input and guidance from their IT resources—need to define, agree on, and endorse a strategy for cybersecurity from the top down, and this strategy needs to be rooted in a cybersecurity framework such as the NIST Cybersecurity Framework or the CIS Critical Controls. This guide is organized to align with the latter, but both NIST and CIS provide a wealth of practical and actionable guidance for organizations to formulate effective cybersecurity strategy in a threat-focused, vendor-neutral way.