It’s already been a week since Equifax announced the massive security breach that affected 137 million consumers.

Out of the 100’s of news pieces and social media comments, here are 3 articles you should read (or re-read) to help you cut to the chase and respond effectively:

1. NBC News: The One Move to Make After the Equifax Breach

Placing your credit record under a freeze essentially places access to your credit under two-factor authentication. It’s a preventative approach, that, when used with monitoring (a responsive approach), can help you protect yourself.

Make it happen: Credit Freeze & Thaw Guide: The best way to protect yourself against identity theft

2. The Federal Trade Commission: The Equifax Data Breach: What to Do

Attorney Seena Gressin recounts the known details of the breach and provides a comprehensive list of steps you can take to protect yourself, including filing your taxes early and entering sensitive information over an encrypted wi-fi connection (look for https or the lock icon in your browser’s navigation window).

3. GO MN: Equifax won’t make you sign away class-action lawsuit rights for using TrustedID

This Minnesota news publication does a stand-up job recounting the uproar surrounding Equifax’s free credit monitoring Terms of Service. Read this article to help you decide whether or not to sign up for TrustedID. Credit Karma is a free credit monitoring alternative to Trusted ID.

Keep an Eye on Equifax

Visit their security breach website: A Progress Update for Consumers

There does not seem to be an option to receive progress updated via email, but you can follow Equifax on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Equifax

The Long Road Ahead

Each individual affected by the Equifax breach will need to be vigilant for months, even years to come. Even a “small” data breach can cost a business an estimated $200,000 in direct and indirect losses, with a thus far incalculable cost to their clients’ well-being and privacy.

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